Maine restaurant loses health and liquor licenses after defying state virus orders — Business — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine
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Maine restaurant loses health and liquor licenses after defying state virus orders — Business — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine

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NEWRY, Maine — The co-owner of Sunday River Brewing Co. in Newry who defied state orders by opening his doors to diners on Friday afternoon has lost his state health and liquor licenses, he said.

More than 150 people came to Sunday River Brewing Co. in Newry on Friday afternoon after co-owner Rick Savage announced Thursday night that he would reopen in defiance of state orders meant to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

After learning that he’d lost the licenses around 4:30 p.m., Savage says he plans to keep operating the restaurant and just pay the daily fines that he will now face.

Although the restaurant initially said it would open at 4 p.m., it started serving food after people showed up by noon in defiance of a March order from Gov. Janet Mills that barred dine-in restaurant service. By 4 p.m., the crowd of diners lined up around the building on Route 2 had grown to roughly 100.

Savage, who announced the restaurant’s opening on Fox News on Thursday night while criticizing the Democratic governor and reading her cellphone number on the air, said that he was not worried some of the diners coming from areas with more documented coronavirus cases would spread it in his restaurant.

[Restaurateur who read Janet Mills’ phone number on TV plans to defy state order]

That was partly because he was enforcing distancing guidelines that other businesses have adopted during the pandemic. If Home Depot, Lowes and Walmart “can do 6-foot spacing and be open,” then could as well, he said.

“I really don’t believe it. I don’t believe it at this point,” he said, when asked if diners might be carrying the virus. “I’m not a medical expert. I serve food, you know.”

Watch: The line at Sunday River Brewing Co. on Friday

As for the many diners standing less than 6 feet from each other while waiting for a seat, he said, “I can’t tell them where to stand and what to do. We’re America. If they want to isolate, they can isolate.”

Savage also said that he is not worried about legal or regulatory repercussions from violating the state’s orders. Violating orders made under the governor’s emergency powers are punishable as a misdemeanor crime and the deputy director of the state’s liquor regulator said Savage could face a penalty if he opened to dine-in customers.

However, Savage did not think he would lose his liquor license because he decided against serving booze on Friday. He said that he decided to violate the state’s orders with the hope that other businesses would decide to join him and so that he could support his 65 employees.

“Until people stand up and work together and actually open up together and force their hand, we’re going to keep losing businesses in the state,” he said.

In general, there appears to be support for the restrictions Mills has put in place. She has received high polling marks for the state’s response to the pandemic, with 72 percent of Mainers saying they somewhat or strongly approve of her handling of the outbreak in a national survey released this week by researchers from Northeastern, Harvard and Rutgers universities.

But the hospitality industry has hammered a plan released by Mills week that would limit restaurants and hotels into the summer. The crowd that turned out to Newry on Friday afternoon was also vehemently opposed.

At one point, diners waiting outside Sunday River Brewing Co. gave Savage a round of applause when he emerged from the restaurant. In interviews, some said they had come to support his operation because they disagreed with Mills’ orders and felt they would be too onerous for the tourism industry.

The fact that some of them were more elderly and at-risk from the harmful effects of the coronavirus did not deter them.

“This is Vacationland,” said Dick Hill, 78, who had driven two hours from his home in Bath after seeing Savage on Fox News. “If she doesn’t let hotels and restaurants open, we’re going to be crushed.”

Hill, a semi-retired financial planner wearing a face mask, said that he disagreed with the waiting diners who were not keeping at least 6 feet from each other. But he said that restaurants could safely operate if they enforced those kinds of rules while noting Maine had fewer than 40 people reportedly hospitalized with the virus as of Friday.

Just after they had reached the front of the line, Tom Bayley, 60, and his 34-year-old son Gaelan expressed similar frustrations about Mills’ orders and said they had come to the restaurant to show solidarity.

The Bayleys run a family campground with 750 sites in Scarborough, they said, and they worry that most out-of-state families won’t be able to justify taking a vacation when those orders call for two weeks of quarantine in Maine. They also said it will be possible for businesses such as theirs to responsibly open without contributing to the health crisis.

“It’s directly hitting our business,” Gaelen Bayley said.

Some of the diners wore red hats supporting President Donald Trump featuring his “Make America Great Again” slogan. But others in the ski town on Friday afternoon were less pleased with the diners’ choices.

“Make America stupid again!” one woman yelled out the window of a passing car.

Watch: Janet Mills outlines her plan to reopen

 


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