Live: Coronavirus daily news updates, May 1: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the nation
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Live: Coronavirus daily news updates, May 1: What to know today about COVID-19 in the Seattle area, Washington state and the nation

State and local governments continue to struggle under the weight of pandemic-induced costs, and are seeking up to $1 trillion in federal aid to avoid layoffs, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday. On Mercer Island, where city officials project they’ll end the year with a $5.6 million deficit, more than 60 city employees have been laid off.

Newly available federal benefits helped draw more than 145,000 new unemployment claims in Washington state last week, pushing the state’s total to nearly three-quarters of a million. Seattle-area households are falling behind on their mortgages, and the idea of a rent strike has traction here and elsewhere. Businesses, too, are finding it hard to pay the rent. 

Gov. Jay Inslee will speak at 2:30 p.m. on how he’ll extend Washington’s stay-home order and what the economic reopening will look like.

Throughout Friday, on this page, we’ll be posting updates from Seattle Times journalists and others on the pandemic and its effects on the Seattle area, the Pacific Northwest and the world. Updates from Thursday can be found here, and all our coronavirus coverage can be found here.

The following graphic includes the most recent numbers from the Washington State Department of Health, released Thursday afternoon.

Live updates:

‘I died and came back’: 12-year-old recovers from virus

One of the sickest children to be treated for COVID-19 is now expected to make a full recovery.

The 12-year-old Louisiana girl’s coronavirus journey didn’t start with many of the symptoms that have affected adults — breathing problems, for example. She had stomach pain and vomiting, and her mother, Jennifer Daly, a radiologist, thought maybe it was appendicitis or some type of stomach problem. But the girl’s lips were turning blue and her limbs were cold.

Daly’s daughter, Juliet, quickly ended up in the emergency room of the local hospital where she had a heart attack, underwent CPR, and was eventually airlifted to Ochsner Medical Center.

Dr. Jake Kleinmahon was one of the doctors who was there to meet her and care for her over the next 10 days.

“Juliet came in as one of the sickest children we’ve taken care of with COVID-19,” said Kleinmahon. The top chamber of her heart was not working correctly with the bottom chamber, and she was developing “multisystem organ failure,” he said.

Kleinmahon said children with coronavirus infections often have different symptoms than adults, such as the abdominal problems Juliet had, or rashes in other cases. He said many children also have another virus besides the coronavirus and that was the case with Juliet.

The girl was on a ventilator for four days, during which she was sedated and then was eventually able to breathe on her own. She was discharged on April 15. The doctor said her heart function is completely normal. Although she likely has a little trauma to her heart that should decrease over time, he expects she’ll have a “totally normal life.”

“I died and came back,” Juliet said.

Read the story here.

 

 

—The Associated Press

Women, people of color and immigrants bear higher burden as front-line workers

The pandemic is exacting a heavy toll on front-line workers who’ve been there since the beginning, packing supplies, caring for the sick, cleaning and disinfecting.

They’ve watched coworkers fall ill, gotten sick themselves, died.

And the burden on them has not been evenly borne across gender, racial and socioeconomic lines, according to an Associated Press analysis of census data in the country’s 100 largest cities. Most of these front-line workers are women, people of color and immigrants.

Workers deemed “essential” are also more likely to live below the federal poverty line or hover just above it. They are more likely to have children at home, and many live with others who also have front-line jobs.

“What is important about this pandemic is that it has shined a spotlight on workers who have always been essential but before this were invisible,” said David Michaels, professor of environmental and occupational health at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University.

Read the story here.

—The Associated Press

Not the beaches! Some Californians draw line at closing what’s seen as birthright

Californians have made innumerable sacrifices in the face of the coronavirus crisis. They stopped working. They kept their children home from school. They have worn masks to the grocery store, canceled birthday parties, called off funerals.

And they have done so willingly, for the most part, successfully keeping the number of cases of COVID-19 and deaths much lower than in hot spots like New York and New Jersey.

But when Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday ordered a temporary “hard close” of all state and local beaches in Orange County despite the protests of elected officials, surfers and cooped-up people who just want to dip their toes in the sand after six weeks of stay-at-home orders, he touched a nerve in a state where a day at the beach is akin to a birthright.

As tensions rise over how and when to reopen the state, the beaches have become a flashpoint in a way some many other parts of life like shopping, working and cheering the Dodgers and Lakers have not.

Read the story here.

—Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times

Lives of essential workers

Essential worker Rocío Luquero, a social worker for the Seattle World School, delivers food to Rosa Ajanel, who gave birth last week. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)
Essential worker Rocío Luquero, a social worker for the Seattle World School, delivers food to Rosa Ajanel, who gave birth last week. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)

“My heart was racing for three weeks.”

Social worker Rocío Luquero braves the pandemic to help some of Seattle’s most vulnerable children, delivering food and guiding families to resources. Other essential workers bag our groceries. They tend to the sick and dying. They drive. They prepare our food.

As they fight on the front lines of a pandemic they never expected to face, a few of these workers share how it’s changing their lives, and what they want you to know.

Patients struggle to get UW’s antibody test amid suspicions, misinformation

Lisa Roberts sits inside her deceased brother’s Dodge Challenger on Thursday. Lisa and her brother, Eric Braunberger, who lived together, felt sick in January. He died April 8 without being tested for COVID-19. Roberts has recovered; she has an appointment for a test next week. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)
Lisa Roberts sits inside her deceased brother’s Dodge Challenger on Thursday. Lisa and her brother, Eric Braunberger, who lived together, felt sick in January. He died April 8 without being tested for COVID-19. Roberts has recovered; she has an appointment for a test next week. (Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times)

Was it COVID-19 that sickened Lisa Roberts and killed her brother?

UW’s virology lab is performing blood tests in an effort to determine whether people were infected, but Roberts and others have had trouble getting their primary care doctors and clinics to order the test.

The troubles come as antibody tests are at the center of political and scientific debates over their reliability.

Read the full story here.

Quarantine Corner: Making it easier to be stuck at home

—Kris Higginson

Catch up on the past 24 hours

Seattle houses seen from Queen Anne’s Ella Bailey Park on Sunday, Feb. 2. (Amanda Snyder / The Seattle Times)
Seattle houses seen from Queen Anne’s Ella Bailey Park on Sunday, Feb. 2. (Amanda Snyder / The Seattle Times)

The number of Seattle-area households behind on their mortgages rose nearly three times faster than the U.S. average as coronavirus spread. Home-sales activity, though, appears to be rebounding after a major slide. If you need emergency aid, here’s where to find it.

Mom-and-pops and corporate giants alike are struggling to pay the rent in Seattle as the real-estate world is wracked by coronavirus impacts.

Thousands of Amazon employees can keep working from home until at least October. This raises the prospect that one of Seattle’s busiest neighborhoods could be largely deserted for another five months. And sales are way up, Amazon reported yesterday, but coronavirus costs may soon wipe out profit.

Early test results suggest a widespread outbreak at Washington state’s biggest beef plant, which largely shut down last week.

This is the 1,400-employee Tyson Fresh Meats plant in Wallula, in Walla Walla County, where the novel coronavirus is spreading. (GREG LEHMAN / Walla Walla Union Bulletin)
This is the 1,400-employee Tyson Fresh Meats plant in Wallula, in Walla Walla County, where the novel coronavirus is spreading. (GREG LEHMAN / Walla Walla Union Bulletin)

Senior White House officials pushed U.S. spy agencies to hunt for evidence to support an unsubstantiated theory that a government lab in Wuhan, China, was the origin of the pandemic, according to current and former U.S. officials. The U.S. is crafting possible retaliatory actions against China for its handling of the pandemic.

Four out of five restaurants may not reopen on the other end of the coronavirus crisis, owners say. Critic Bethany Jean Clement looks at what we stand to lose in Seattle, and what we need to rethink.

Macy’s plans to reopen all of its 775 stores in six to eight weeks, starting Monday. The company is describing what a pandemic-era shopping experience might look like.

Boeing is telling the government “no thanks.” The plane maker sold $25 billion of bonds to eliminate the need for federal aid and the strings that would be attached to it.

Bill Gates is standing tall on COVID-19 at a time when leadership is rare in our “fractious, divided republic,” columnist Jon Talton writes. He contrasts the world’s second-richest person’s actions with what the richest one is doing.

—Kris Higginson

How is this outbreak affecting you?

What has changed about your daily life? What kinds of discussions are you having with family members and friends? Are you a health care worker who’s on the front lines of the response? Are you a COVID-19 patient or do you know one? Whoever you are, we want to hear from you so our news coverage is as complete, accurate and useful as possible. If you’re using a mobile device and can’t see the form on this page, click here.

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